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Lower Extremity Orthoses

Rigidafo.jpg (6081 bytes) Custom rigid Ankle foot Orthoses (AFOs) are fabricated from a cast of the client's leg. Often special graphics are placed on the device  at the client's request. Cerebral palsy, spina bifida, post CVA, multiple sclerosis are pathologies frequently treated with this type of AFO.

 

 

Hinged AFO's which allow plantar and/or dorsiflexion, often also have joints which encourage or assist motion of a flail joint or segment. Inversion/eversion can be controlled through the effective use of subtalar joint straps and pads.Other designs of AFOs have anterior plastic shells which utilize the Ground Reaction Force (GRF) to assist or restrict ankle and foot motion. 

 

 

Hingeafo.jpg (6982 bytes)
Campsol1.jpg (3013 bytes)  

 

ToeOFF design AFO is fabricated of carbon and Kevlar which offers high patient comfort and convenience. Its design absorbs force at heel strike and propels the foot at toe-off achieving a more normal and dynamic gait.

 

 

Klenzak AFO is a conventional design which allows plantar and/or dorsiflexion. It  often has joints which encourage or assist motion of a flail joint or segment. Inversion/eversion can be controlled through the effective use of subtalar joint straps and pads. Detachable uprights allow for shoe changes to match the client's clothing.

 

Klenzak.jpg (8507 bytes)

 

Kafo_orn.jpg (57586 bytes) Knee Ankle Foot Orthoses (KAFOs) are fabricated in the conventional fashion (pictured) or as custom plastic design (similar to the hinged AFO above) depending on the individual client's needs. In addition to the features offered by an AFO, KAFOs may assist or limit knee range of motion, medial/lateral laxities and muscle weaknesses influencing the knee joint.

 

 

 

 

Send mail to questions@orthotics.on.ca for further information or comments about this web site.
Copyright 1998 C.M. Renwick, C.O.(c) & Algonquin Orthopaedics
Last modified: December 21, 2005